14 May 2014

2,400 walks

That's the number of times I've gone out for walks in the vineyard with Callie the collie. Approximately, of course. I've been taking daily walks for seven years now, rain or shine.


I go for a walk with the dog every day, either morning or late afternoon. There are exceptions to that rule. I take a vacation or even two every year. For example, I go the the U.S. for two weeks in the spring. Once in a while I go to Paris for a few days. Then Walt has to take all the walks I'm missing.


In other words, Walt has taken more walks in the vineyard than I have. I'm sure of it. He doesn't go to the U.S. every year, and he doesn't go to Paris as often as I do. Callie gets two walks a day, so she has gone for walks in the vineyard more than 5,000 times in her short life.


It's hard to say exactly how many kilometers or miles those 2,400 or 5,000 walks represent. My total kilométrage is probably 6,000 or 7,000, because I walk an average of 2.5 to 3 km per day. That comes to about 4,000 miles — the distance from Saint-Aignan to my home town in North Carolina. Callie has walked at least twice that far.

10 comments:

  1. What a great set of health statistics....
    but...
    Callie is a Border Collie....
    "at least twice" is a pretty good understatement of just how far she's travelled....
    four times would be a closer guesstimate.
    Many more happy walkies to you all!!

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  2. Bonjour, Ken. Did you happen to catch the story this morning on NPR of "Canis vertigus"? These dogs clocked serious mileage/kilometrage.
    "The Turnspit dog was an essential part of every large kitchen in Britain in the 16th century. The small cooking canine was bred to run in a wheel that turned a roasting spit in cavernous kitchen fireplaces."
    (Listen to the story on npr.org)

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  3. Dean, I didn't hear that NPR report, but I know about the dogs turning spits in château fireplaces. At the Château du Moulin, near Romo, there's such a device. We went on a guided tour there back in 2000. The guide very carefully explained, in French, the way the device worked. And then he said, "Après quelques minutes de travail, le résultat ? Un hot dog !" Cute, eh?

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    2. Callie a dû être soulagée de voir que votre cuisinière Smeg était dotée d'une "tournebroche sans roue". :-)

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    3. Du livre, "La vie des animaux illustrée,
      Description populaire du règne animal, Volume 1":
      "Dupont de Nemours nous parle de deux chiens tournebroches, en 1813 : « Tous deux savaient leur métier. Ils ne laissaient jamais brûler un rôti. L’odeur leur disait lorsqu’il était cuit à point, et ils en avertissaient le cuisinier en jappant."
      Amusant, non?

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    4. Dean, j'ai regardé dans mes archives, mais je ne trouve pas de photos prises dans la cuisine du château de Moulin. La photo à l'intérieur du château était peut-être interdite. Si je me souviens bien, la petite cage circulaire dans laquelle courait le chien pour actionner le tournebroche était vraiment minuscule. Cuisine mexicaine, si ça se trouve...

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  4. Wow. Lots of kilomètres -- excellent for all three of you.

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  5. Part of why you are all so healthy! And happy. I think walking in beautiful places does make people happy.

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  6. Ken, you must be in a good shape,Congratulations.

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