15 May 2014

Growing grapes

All we need around here is more grapes, right? Well, I guess you can never have too many. I've decided to see if I can grow some.


We already have some grapevines in our yard. They are some kind of white table grapes, and they aren't all that sweet or juicy. They are planted in shade, which isn't ideal. Grapes love sun and heat. We pick the leaves in the spring to make dolmas, but we don't even bother with the grapes.


What I've decided to see if I can grow is wine grapes. I read that it is easy to propagate the vines. All you have to do is cut a long cane off a vine and stick it in the ground. I didn't even have to cut a cane — the people who work in the vines do that job every winter. Mostly they just throw the canes on the ground, and later somebody comes through with a grinding machine and mulches them.


I gathered a few over the winter, after the vineyard pruning was done, and just let them lie on the ground outdoors for several weeks before I planted them. In March, as I read was the time to do it, I potted them up. I was actually a little surprised when they sprouted leaves. I think I have to keep them in pots for a couple of years. Then I'll have to figure out where to plant them. Some are red grapes, and some are white.

15 comments:

  1. À quand le "Domaine des Bouleaux?"

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  2. We grew a line of Muscat de Hamburg grapes on our allotment in Leeds...
    I tried all the book methods on some prunings on a neighbouring greenhouse...
    5cm half twigs with one bud, laid just under the soil.... nada! [and it was meant to be the surest way!!?]
    3" cuttings, buried so that only the top bud was visible at soil level.... nada!
    6" cuttings, as for the 3" but with two buds visible.... got some leaf, but they didn't take!!
    Noticed the buds beginning to open on some scrawny leftovers that were destined to become pea sticks...
    whacked them in a couple of pots....
    all but one took... so we lined them out.
    But they were too young before we left to provide more than a couple of tiddly bunches....
    but those were very tasty...
    ours went in the ground after a year in the pot....
    and I then transplanted them after a year...
    I think the huge root system that I had to cut through at that point had to regrow before they got going again...
    if I did it again, I would pot them on in bigger pots until they were ready to go out.

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  3. And just think, this is how all of the great vineyards began ;)

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    Replies
    1. Ooh, that would be a grand goal. But we'd have to buy a lot of land. And at my age...

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  4. I look forward to seeing how you do. Being surrounded by vineyards, as you are, I would want to give it a try, too.

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    Replies
    1. It's just kind of fun to see what will grow.

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  5. Hello Ken, Congratultions! You did it. We grow Interlaken Grapes. They are light green, most delicious eating grapes, thin skin, no seeds and cold hardy.

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    Replies
    1. My idea is just to grow grapes for decorative purposes, and to honor the region's main crop and economy. We'll see what happens.

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  6. Wow, so I think I should come to your for a glass of wine. Next year maybe..

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  7. I planted my grapes vines to create an outdoor napping zone, an arbor area with five different seedless eatable grapes. That was ten years ago and by the fourth summer it promised to be the favorite space in my yard for all that visit me. It probably measure 10 by 10 ft and nine ft high. About three vines on three sides. Thanks for reminding me this is the best time to harvest a few leaves. My grapes in the fall have always been secondary but honestly it is the bountiful crop of grapes and I dried enough to make four pints of raisins.

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  8. What a good thing to have done, Loretta. I'd love to see your arbor. Are there pictures on your blog? And the raisins sound great. I'm thinking that my grapes, if they indeed grow to be big plants, will more decorative than anything else.

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